Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law


Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law



Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law Firms
Antitrust Laws exist because of the belief that the economy functions best when competitors have limits for permitted activities. Activities governed by laws include monopoly, pricing limitations, predatory practices, merger control and advertising. Related areas include: consumer protection, torts (wrongful interference, slander, etc.), intellectual property, employment and contracts.

Antitrust Law - US

  • ABA - Antitrust Law Section

    The American Bar Association Section of Antitrust Law is the leading professional organization for those interested in the fields of antitrust and competition law, trade regulation, consumer protection and economics. Our more than 8,000 members include attorneys and non-lawyers from private law firms, in-house counsel, non-profit organizations, consulting firms, federal and state government agencies, as well as judges, professors and law students. We provide an outstanding assortment of programs, publications, discussion groups and timely updates on recent developments in all facets of antitrust and consumer protection law.

  • Antitrust and Unfair Competition Law - Definition

    Competition law is known in the United States as "antitrust law". The substance and practice of competition law vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Protecting the interests of consumers (consumer welfare) and ensuring that enterpreneurs have an opportunity to compete in the market economy are often treated as important objectives.

  • Clayton Antitrust Act

    This Act is a civil statute (carrying no criminal penalties) that prohibits mergers or acquisitions that are likely to lessen competition. Under this Act, the government challenges those mergers that careful economic analysis shows are likely to increase prices to consumers. All persons considering a merger or acquisition above a certain size must notify both the Antitrust Division and the Federal Trade Commission. The Act also prohibits other business practices that may harm competition under certain circumstances.

  • Federal Trade Commission Act

    The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 (15 U.S.C §§ 41-58, as amended) established the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), a bipartisan body of five members appointed by the President of the United States for seven year terms. This Commission was authorized to issue Cease and Desist orders to large corporations to curb unfair trade practices. This Act also gave more flexibility to the US congress for judicial matters.

  • FTC - Guide to the Antitrust Laws

    Free and open markets are the foundation of a vibrant economy. Aggressive competition among sellers in an open marketplace gives consumers — both individuals and businesses — the benefits of lower prices, higher quality products and services, more choices, and greater innovation. The FTC's competition mission is to enforce the rules of the competitive marketplace — the antitrust laws. These laws promote vigorous competition and protect consumers from anticompetitive mergers and business practices. The FTC's Bureau of Competition, working in tandem with the Bureau of Economics, enforces the antitrust laws for the benefit of consumers.

  • Robinson-Patman Act

    The Robinson-Patman Act of 1936 (or Anti-Price Discrimination Act, Pub. L. No. 74-692, 49 Stat. 1526 (codified at 15 U.S.C. § 13)) is a United States federal law that prohibits what were considered, at the time of passage, to be anticompetitive practices by producers, specifically price discrimination. It grew out of practices in which chain stores were allowed to purchase goods at lower prices than other retailers. The Act provided for criminal penalties, but contained a specific exemption for "cooperative associations".

  • Sherman Antitrust Act

    The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act, July 2, 1890, ch. 647, 26 Stat. 209, 15 U.S.C. § 1–7), was the first United States government action to limit cartels and monopolies. It is the first and oldest of all U.S., federal, antitrust laws.

  • USDOJ - Antitrust Division

    The mission of the Antitrust Division is to promote economic competition through enforcing and providing guidance on antitrust laws and principles. In 1933, under the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Attorney General Homer S. Cummings, the Antitrust Division was established, and Harold M. Stephens was appointed the first Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Antitrust Division.

  • USDOJ - Antitrust Enforcement and the Consumer

    Many consumers have never heard of antitrust laws, but when these laws are effectively and responsibly enforced, they can save consumers millions and even billions of dollars a year in illegal overcharges. Most states have antitrust laws, and so does the federal government. Essentially, these laws prohibit business practices that unreasonably deprive consumers of the benefits of competition, resulting in higher prices for inferior products and services.

Antitrust Law - International

  • ABA - International Antitrust Law Committee

    The Committee is an international network of antitrust practitioners and officials from many jurisdictions, including those with established and developing antitrust regimes. We provide a unique forum for practitioners and others with an interest in antitrust to learn about antitrust developments around the world as they happen, influence international antitrust policy and laws, and connect with an interesting and fun group of professionals from all corners of the globe.

  • Competition Policy and Law Database - APEC

    Competition policy has emerged as an important aspect of international business. Businesses operating within the Asia Pacific region are no exception. Competition policy is complex and varies greatly from member to member. Some APEC member economies have laws dating back more than a century, some have relatively recent laws, and others still have no laws at all. Recognizing this disparity of conditions among member economies, gathering and collating information and the establishment of a regional database is one essential step towards narrowing the competition information gap among member economies.

  • Global Competition Law Centre

    The Global Competition Law Centre (GCLC) is a research centre of the College of Europe. It was founded on 1 January 2004, aims to promote rigorous legal and economic analysis of competition policy reforms in the EU and globally, and to provide a discussion forum for academics, practitioners, and enforcement officers in the competition field.

  • International Bar Association - Antitrust Committee

    The Antitrust Committee provides an international forum for the exchange of the most current thinking in the field of antitrust law. In addition, there is a strong commitment to bring together international practitioners to facilitate closer working relationships. The committee is increasingly relied upon by government officials and members of the private sector for its expertise and practical input into antitrust developments

Organizations Related to Antitrust Law

  • American Antitrust Institute (AAI)

    The American Antitrust Institute is an independent Washington-based non-profit education, research, and advocacy organization. Our mission is to increase the role of competition, assure that competition works in the interests of consumers, and challenge abuses of concentrated economic power in the American and world economy. We have a centrist legal-economic ideology and promote the vigorous use of antitrust as a vital component of national and international competition policy.

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